Author: Jason Kelley

5 links

www.eff.org > Jason Kelley and Shirin Mori
Deceptive Checkboxes Should Not Open Our Checkbooks
9 apr. 2021 - Last week, the New York Times highlighted the Trump 2020 campaign’s use of deceptive web designs to deceive supporters into donating far more money than they had intended. The campaign’s digital donation portal hid an unassuming but unfair method for siphoning funds: a pre-checked box to “make a monthly recurring donation.” This caused weekly withdrawals from supporters’ bank accounts, with some being depleted.
 · consent · dark-patterns

www.eff.org > Jason Kelley
Face Surveillance and the Capitol Attack
12 jan. 2021 - After last week’s violent attack on the Capitol, law enforcement is working overtime to identify the perpetrators. This is critical to accountability for the attempted insurrection. Law enforcement has many, many tools at their disposal to do this, especially given the very public nature of most of the organizing. But we object to one method reportedly being used to determine who was involved: law enforcement using facial recognition technologies to compare photos of unidentified individuals from the Capitol attack to databases of photos of known individuals. There are just too many risks and problems in this approach, both technically and legally, to justify its use.
 · facial-recognition · not-read

www.eff.org > Jason Kelley
ExamSoft Flags One-Third of California Bar Exam Test Takers for Cheating
22 dec. 2020 - One of EFF’s chief concerns about exam proctoring software—in addition to the fact that it subjects students to excessive surveillance—is the risk that it will incorrectly flag students for cheating, called “false positives.” This can be due either to the software’s technical failures or to its requirements that students have relatively new computers and access to near-broadband speeds. Last week, the California Bar released data confirming our fear of false positives: during its use of ExamSoft for the October Bar exam, over one-third of the nearly nine-thousand online examinees were flagged by the software (13:00 into the video of the California Committee of Bar Examiners meeting).
 · educational-surveillance · false-positives · proctoring

www.eff.org > Jason Kelley and Lindsay Oliver
Proctoring Apps Subject Students to Unnecessary Surveillance
20 aug. 2020 - With COVID-19 forcing millions of teachers and students to rethink in-person schooling, this moment is ripe for an innovation in learning. Unfortunately, many schools have simply substituted surveillance technology for real transformation. The use of proctoring apps—privacy-invasive software products that “watch” students as they take tests or complete schoolwork, has skyrocketed. These apps make a seductive promise: that schools can still rely on high-stakes tests, where they have complete control of a student's environment, even during remote learning. But that promise comes with a huge catch—these apps violate student privacy, negatively impact some populations, and will likely never fully stop creative students from outsmarting the system.
 · educational-surveillance · proctoring · project-iis · workplace-surveillance