Author: Katitza Rodriguez

3 links

www.eff.org > Cindy Cohn, Karen Gullo and Katitza Rodriguez
European Court on Human Rights Bought Spy Agencies’ Spin on Mass Surveillance
26 may. 2021 - The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) Grand Chamber this week affirmed what we’ve long known, that the United Kingdom’s mass surveillance regime, which involved the indiscriminate and suspicionless interception of people’s communications, violated basic human rights to privacy and free expression. We applaud the Strasbourg-based Grand Chamber, the highest judicial body of the Council of Europe, for the ruling and for its strong stance demanding new safeguards to prevent privacy abuses, beyond those required by a lower court in 2018.
 · echr · gchq · mass-surveillance · oversight · united-kingdom

www.eff.org > Bennett Cyphers, Hinako Sugiyama and Katitza Rodriguez
Japan’s Rikunabi Scandal Shows The Dangers of Privacy Law Loopholes
12 may. 2021 - Technology users around the world are increasingly concerned, and rightly so, about protecting their data. But many are unaware of exactly how their data is being collected and would be shocked to learn of the scope and implications of mass consumer data collection by technology companies. For example, many vendors use tracking technologies including cookies—a small piece of text that is stored in your browser that lets websites recognize your browser, see your browsing activity or IP address but not your name or address—to build expansive profiles about user behavior over time and across apps and sites. Such data can be used to infer, predict, or evaluate information about a user or group. User profiles may or may not be accurate, fair, or discriminatory, but can still be used to inform life-altering decisions about them.
 · consent · cookies · data-protection · eu · gdpr · japan · machine-learning · recruitment · tracking

www.eff.org > Katitza Rodriguez and Svea Windwehr
Workplace Surveillance in Times of Corona
10 sep. 2020 - With numbers of COVID-19 infections soaring again in the United States and around the world, we have to learn how to manage its long-term ramifications for our economies. As people adjust to minimizing the risk of infections in everyday settings, one critical context is work. Even though millions have shifted to working from home during the past months, remote work is not possible for every industry. While the pandemic has had a critical disruptive effect on work and employment virtually everywhere in the world, it has not affected everyone in the same ways. The International Labor Organization notes that the current crisis significantly affects women, workers in precarious situations who lack access to health care or limited social security benefits, and informal workers, who work jobs that are not taxed or registered by the government. In Latin America, 60% of workers are considered informal, with 58% of informal workers living in economic vulnerability on 13 U.S. dollars or less per day or in poverty on less than 5.5 U.S. dollars per day. Many have no choice but to work outside the home. This can involve putting their health and livelihoods on the line, especially in countries with insufficient public health care or unemployment programs.
 · covid-19 · gdpr · location · privacy · unions · workplace-surveillance