Tag: blockchain

24 links

crookedtimber.org > Jessica Green
Can the World’s Bankers Really Save the Climate?
6 may. 2021 - The Ministry for the Future (TMFTF) should be lauded for reimagining global climate governance. It recognizes what many climate scholars do not: climate change is in large measure, a problem of extreme wealth and wealth inequality. Thus, addressing the climate crisis requires discussing “potential alternatives to the global neoliberal order” (155). Moreover, the Ministry is keenly aware of the shrinking window for action. Addressing climate change is a race against time, rather than a “tragedy of the commons.” Thus, we should be less worried about getting everyone to participate in international agreements, and more worried about acting quickly, since delay will make climate problems harder to solve, and could result in irreversible changes. What follows from these two premises is nothing less than a wholesale reimagining of the global economy, as enacted through coordinated efforts by the world’s biggest central banks. However, the Ministry’s proposed technocratic solutions overlook the messiness of domestic politics, and the huge challenge of constraining powerful anti-climate interests.
 · banking · blockchain · carbon-pricing · climate-change · cryptocurrencies · inequality

crookedtimber.org > Maria Farrell
What is Ours is Only Ours to Give
4 may. 2021 - Kim Stanley Robinson’s books are how I think about the future. I’m not exaggerating when I say they’re how I manage to think about it at all. They provide much of the temporal and political context in which I do my work, which is to say, they educate me and let me know I’m not alone. Future uses of data and networks are a tiny part of The Ministry for the Future (TMFTF), just as tech policy only counts, now, insofar as it serves our species-wide effort to survive and perhaps flourish. TMFTF does some thinking on how network and information technology – specifically, social media and blockchain – can do the genuinely liberatory work they’ve long been hailed as making possible. I’ve worked in tech policy since the late nineties and will talk mostly in this piece about ways that might work sooner and better to get us to a desirable tech future, and one that gets less in the way of dealing with climate crisis. (I use ‘climate crisis’ as shorthand for the cluster of anthropogenic extinction events described in TMFTF.)
 · ai-ethics · amazon · artificial-intelligence · big-tech · blockchain · china · climate-change · commons · data-commons · data-portability · facebook · feminism · google · interoperability · misogyny · open-standards · social-graph · social-media · solutionism · surveillance-capitalism

networkcultures.org > Silvia Dal Dosso
Cats, Frogs and Cryptoartists: What if Auteur .jpgs Become a Luxury Good
11 mar. 2021 - When in July 2013 I met Andreas Schildbach, the first developer to write the Bitcoin Wallet for mobile, one Bitcoin was worth around 80 euros. We were sitting at a table in a bar, the Room 77, which had recently hit the headlines because the owner, Joerg Platzer, had been interviewed by the BBC for the insane act of accepting Bitcoin as a form of direct payment. Still not satisfied, Joerg had managed to convince many shops on the street, Graefestraße, to do the same, and for this reason the area was dubbed by the few nerds who knew about it and by the owners of those same shops, Bitcoin Kiez. While I was interviewing Andreas (for a documentary I was shooting), around us a bunch of developers and crypto anarchists were chatting and drinking, but Andreas was so focused on his story and I was consequently so busy trying to understand what he was saying that the voices around us had disappeared.
 · 4chan · art · blockchain · climate-change · copyright · crypto-art · decentralization · digital-art · memes · nft-s

www.schneier.com > Barath Raghavan and Bruce Schneier
Illegal Content and the Blockchain
15 mar. 2021 - Security researchers have recently discovered a botnet with a novel defense against takedowns. Normally, authorities can disable a botnet by taking over its command-and-control server. With nowhere to go for instructions, the botnet is rendered useless. But over the years, botnet designers have come up with ways to make this counterattack harder. Now the content-delivery network Akamai has reported on a new method: a botnet that uses the Bitcoin blockchain ledger. Since the blockchain is globally accessible and hard to take down, the botnet’s operators appear to be safe.
 · bitcoin · blockchain · botnets · censorship · china · cryptocurrencies · metcalfes-law · security · tor · trust

copyrightandtechnology.com > Bill Rosenblatt
Are NFTs DRM by Another Name?
15 mar. 2021 - Twenty years ago, when the first generation of DRM technologies hit the market, one of the benefits they touted was that with DRM-packaged files, consumers could be sure that they were getting the genuine content from the source. For example, if the content was a scientific journal article with research results, they could be confident that it wasn’t altered. Nobody remembers this, because nobody cared.
 · blockchain · copyright · digital-art · drm · intellectual-property · music · nft-s

people.csail.mit.edu > Michael Specter, Neha Narula, Ronald L. Rivest and Sunoo Park
Going from Bad to Worse: From Internet Voting to Blockchain Voting
6 nov. 2020 - Voters are understandably concerned about election security. News reports of possible election in-terference by foreign powers, of unauthorized voting, of voter disenfranchisement, and of technologicalfailures call into question the integrity of elections worldwide.This article examines the suggestions that “voting over the Internet” or “voting on the blockchain”would increase election security, and finds such claims to be wanting and misleading. While currentelection systems are far from perfect, Internet- and blockchain-based voting would greatly increase therisk of undetectable, nation-scale election failures.Online voting may seem appealing: voting from a computer or smartphone may seem convenient andaccessible. However, studies have been inconclusive, showing that online voting may have little to noeffect on turnout in practice, and it may even increase disenfranchisement. More importantly: given thecurrent state of computer security, any turnout increase derived from with Internet- or blockchain-basedvoting would come at the cost of losing meaningful assurance that votes have been counted as they werecast, and not undetectably altered or discarded. This state of affairs will continue as long as standardtactics such as malware, zero days, and denial-of-service attacks continue to be effective.This article analyzes and systematizes prior research on the security risks of online and electronicvoting, and show that not only do these risks persist in blockchain-based voting systems, but blockchainsmay introduceadditionalproblems for voting systems. Finally, we suggest questions for critically assessingsecurity risks of new voting system proposals.
 · blockchain · electronic-voting · not-read · voting

www.schneier.com > Bruce Schneier
US Postal Service Files Blockchain Voting Patent
28 aug. 2020 - A voting system can use the security of blockchain and the mail to provide a reliable voting system. A registered voter receives a computer readable code in the mail and confirms identity and confirms correct ballot information in an election. The system separates voter identification and votes to ensure vote anonymity, and stores votes on a distributed ledger in a blockchain.
 · blockchain · elections · electronic-voting